on a Maine mountain

Here, my mind can cross the thoughts of birds;
___land on a summit’s fingertip or drift
into clear blue until it’s out of words.

Nerves flutter in a teasing gust so soft
___I fall into the arms of starry spaces,
my heart takes in the universe undwarfed.

Blank as these dreamless, purple-mountain faces,
___beyond the perfect coil of clay God made
(which I have tangled up and kinked in places),

I bathe in inklings’ freshening cascade,
___attempt to sponge the feeling’s sparkling flow
with paper; a few drops that do not fade

from me as these high reaches pale below,
___that are not lost to hollows deep in Stow.

 

Timothy Richardson’s poetry has been published by Partisan Review and Harvard Divinity Bulletin and his work has inspired eight films. His DVD, The Force of Poetry, captures his reading and presentation on the meaning, mechanics and significance of poetry with traditional and complex poetic forms explained on screen.

 

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4 Responses

  1. Bruce E. Wren

    Beautiful and intriguing poetry, glad to become acquainted with this poet. What is “Stow”?

    Reply
    • Con Chapman

      There is a town in Maine named Stow–I assume that’s the reference since the poem is set on a Maine mountain.

      Reply
  2. Sally Cook

    You understand the heart of poetry so construct a notable poem . The obvious respect you have for form, vocabulary and all the other components makes your poem a joy to read;

    Reply
  3. Sally Cook

    I have had some trouble commenting, but will try once more..

    . I admire your careful attention to form and vocabulary . Your poem was a joy ti read because You understand the heart of poetry Please, publish more.

    Reply

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