Wee hours, when crickets tune their eerie cords
and hoot the yawning owls at twinkling stars;
the night-maid roves seesaw, like a drunken bard,
besmeared with stripes of billion moonlight-scars!

A slithering thief along the parapet wall,
a snaking beau crossing the forlorn street,
a Robin chirping sweet on sandy knoll…
decrying all, she glides with nimble feet!

While slumbers world, in wonted joys and pain
of dreams, the sleepless Stygean Queen patrols
in peace, sans smiles or frowns, the earth and main,
till dawns the day-despot for glorious strolls.

But lo, unlike her Lord with blazing arms,
she’s calm and rules the world with soothing balms!

 

Once an advocate, Sathya Narayana joined the Government of India as Inspector of Salt in 1984 and received two service promotions. In May 2014, he took voluntary retirement as Superintendent of Salt.

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26 Responses

  1. Leonard Dabydeen

    Salutations, Dear Friend Sathya for picturing such beauty of ‘The Night’. The imagery is captivating to blend the night with such intimacy. And the picture is awesome. Kudos!

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      Thank you very much Sir Leonard Dabydeen. I know you are always there for me.

      Reply
  2. Satyananda Sarangi

    Greetings Sir!

    The images are flowing mid air and soothing the mood after dusk. 🙂
    I have always loved your poetry and this is one of those poems that lies beyond the mundane.

    Regards

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      Thank you Mr. Sarangi ji. Recently a friend asked me (in Facebook) about other Indian poets in the society…without any hesitation I gave your name. In fact I have been reading your poetry keenly and of course I love it so much.

      Reply
      • Satyananda Sarangi

        Sir,

        I am humbled for such a kind gesture. And without any hesitation, you can address me by my name for in our land, good wishes of elders are same as God’s. 🙂

        Regards

  3. KCS Sastry

    As usual, your write-up with stunning imagery is so pleasing. Kudos to you my friend Satya garu. God bless you in all your future endeavours.

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      Oh, thank you very much Sir. Sure, this is the pithiest compliment I have ever received. Thank you Sir once again.

      Reply
  4. Sally Cook

    Such microscopic detail, so simple but at the same time so accurate!
    The entire sonnet works together to produce a beautiful image.
    Thank you.

    Reply
  5. James Sale

    Very accomplished poetry – as David P Behrens says: ‘classical’. In particular this struck as so wonderfully Keatsian, as the presiding genius who has influenced you. One of my all-time favourites. Great stuff!

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      Thank you very much Sir. Oh I am overwhelmed by these compliments. I bow to you all my friends.

      Reply
  6. Rajendra Singh

    A Romantic portrayal of night’s serene quietitude through many touching images.

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      Thank you very much Sir. These are the best compliments I have ever received

      Reply
  7. David Watt

    It is a pleasure to read such consistently vivid imagery in this sonnet.

    Reply
  8. Sri Wele Cebuda

    Mr. Sathyanarayana’s words and grammar shift about, like moonlight in the night, perhaps as Mr. Sarangi suggests in the “flowing mid-air” images; nor is Mr. Sathyanarayana averse to dactylic adjectives in the typical sonnet’s iambics: “slithering thief,” “parapet wall,” “Stygean Queen,” “glorious strolls.” Although the diction is simple, I am constantly second-guessing what his phrasing means. For example, does he mean “chords” in line one, or not? Ms. Cook points out his attention to detail, which Mr. Sale correctly identifies as the Keatsian quality in the writing. I agree with Mr. Behrens and Mr. Sale that this is classical as it relates to the definition of classical as it frequently is used at SCP (but not, perhaps as T. S. Eliot used it). My favourite trope is the simile in lines 3 & 4, but his adjectives are also rich and the personification throughout bewitching. Here the octave does not play against the sestet, but rather the quatrains against the couplet.

    Reply
  9. కైలాస్ నాథ్

    రేఇ గుండెల్లో ని గాయాలకు చలువ పూతలు పూసిన మీ కవనానికి వందనాలు

    Reply
    • Sathyanarayana

      మీదైన తెలుఁగు ముద్ర న్యూయార్క వారి అంతర్జాలం లో . ధన్యవాదములు

      Reply

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