This Collar, Blue

My elbows leak with grease
And all my toes are laid with steel
I’m rough of neck
My knuckles specked with cuts that never heal
The world I mend
The swirls on plastic lens paints squalor’s view
Ah, but still, I’d never trade this collar, blue

 

In Bloom

A terzanelle

How sweet the summer sun defeats the gloom
How numb the winter made these fragile bones
How sweet the summer sun can seem in bloom

“Come sleep beneath the skies that beckon home”
The ocean surf is calling at my name
How numb the winter made these fragile bones

This heart, where once roamed free, was bound in chains
Though, never for a moment did it yield
The ocean surf is calling at my name

The blinding nothing blanketed the fields
My breath was writing heartache in the sky
Though, never for a moment did it yield

This voice did bray and mourn for which it vies
My soul was held aloft in every song
My breath was writing heartache in the sky

The sun spoke “come and rest where you belong”
How sweet the summer sun defeats the gloom
My soul was held aloft in every song
How sweet the summer sun can seem in bloom

 

 

Zachary Dilks is a writer currently residing just outside of Austin, Texas. A toolmaker by trade and a poet by heart, he began pursuing his passion for writing at age 17.

Related Post

‘A Cello Knows’ and Other Poetry by Andrew Todd ... A Cello Knows Amidst the smoke and light and laughter Along the smiles and cheers thereafter A sound is bled, wrung free from strings It bounds an...

27 Responses

  1. E. V. "Beth" Wyler

    Sometimes blue collar workers aren’t given proper credit. Everyone who works hard to earn an honest livelihood should be respected. Also, many blue collar workers are highly skilled and perform invaluable services. They also earn more than many college grads with liberal arts degrees. I particularly enjoyed the last sentence. Regarding your 2nd poem, I find Villanelles to be quite challenging; however, I did enjoy your imagery. Keep on writing!

    E. V.

    Reply
    • C.B. Anderson

      Beth,

      I don’t understand why you find villanelles so challenging. The first principle is to find two rhyme-endings that have many solutions in the English language. The same problem occurs when trying to write a Petrarchan sonnet, but in both cases the difficulty is rather easily solved. See:

      http://www.versewisconsin.org/Issue105/poems105/anderson.html

      and scroll down to “Featherweight” here::

      http://www.strongverse.org/cgi-bin/poiesis.pl?search=Anderson_C_B&header=poet&category=poem&method=perfect&order_by=number&order=cba&template=poem

      Reply
      • E. V. "Beth" Wyler

        Oh, yes, I do find Villanelles somewhat challenging to write. However, that’s not inherently bad; challenges frequently give rise to our best work. Finding appropriate rhymes is actually the easiest part of Villanelle composition. The challenge involves abiding by its rhyming pattern while simultaneously satisfying ALL the Villanelle’s other requirements (i.e., deciding upon your recurring lines, mapping your message stanza by stanza, and weaving your words so that the recurring lines grammatically “fit” into their allotted places; all while working with rhyme and meter and, of course, communicating your message in a poetic voice). I enjoy writing Villanelles, but refrain from trying to do so when I fatigued.

    • Zachary Dilks

      E.V.
      I’m glad you liked the poems. I’ve always felt a certain sense of tranquility when I’m making something and working with my hands. It’s a great life to live.
      I think any poem where you have repeating lines that need to all flow together and blend well is definitely a challenge. Thank you, and I hope you’ll enjoy more of my poems in the future.
      Zachary Dilks

      Reply
      • E. V. "Beth" Wyler

        Yes! I’ll keep an eye out for them. Keep writing!

        E. V.

  2. David Paul Behrens

    Nice poems, Zachary. Here is one I wrote many years ago when I worked in a factory. It could be lyrics for a song. Any songwriters out there?

    GRAVEYARD BLUES

    Quarter past five and the sky”s getting light
    That old yellow sun will soon be in sight
    I’ m driving home, I’ve been up all night
    With these overtime, graveyard blues

    Everywhere I look, there’s nobody around
    Folks are just waking up, all over town
    So they can go to work ’til the sun goes down
    While I’ve got these old graveyard blues

    After work I relax, as a general rule
    Sit on my porch, watch the kids go to school
    Drinking beer in the morning, I look like a fool
    And I’ve got these old graveyard blues

    My family’s waking up, I am ready for bed
    When I should be awake, I’m asleep instead
    Sometimes I feel I must be out of my head
    And I get these old graveyard blues

    Someday I’ll get a job, before my working days are done
    When I won’t have to sleep beneath the heat of the sun
    Spend every night with my wife, have a whole lot of fun
    And forget about these graveyard blues

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      David
      Thank you I’m glad you liked the poems! That’s a nice one. There’s something magical about being awake when all the world is seemingly asleep, isn’t there?
      Zachary Dilks

      Reply
    • E. V. "Beth" Wyler

      It does sound like it could be a country song. Good luck with it.

      E. V.

      Reply
  3. Sally Cook

    Dear Mr. Dilks –

    Yours is sensitive and beautiful work, backed up by experience. Keep on, and please share more.

    Sally Cook

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      Sally
      Thank you, that means the world to me! I’ll keep writing and I hope you’ll keep enjoying!
      Zachary Dilks

      Reply
  4. C.B. Anderson

    “In Bloom” is definitely not a villanelle. It looks to be a terzanelle, a hybrid between a villanelle and terza rima.

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      Ben
      That’s so cool on so many levels! I think it’s neat how differently people can interpret art.
      Thank you for singing my words!
      Zachary Dilks

      Reply
  5. C.B. Anderson

    Zachary,

    I’m sorry to have misspelled your first name in my previous comment.

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      C.B.
      No worries. Better to have misspelled my first name than to have mispronounced my last name like all of my school teachers.
      Zachary Dilks

      Reply
      • C.B. Anderson

        Noted. But is there more than one way to pronounce it?

      • Zachary Dilks

        C.B.
        They used to leave out the L and pronounce it Dicks

  6. C.B. Anderson

    Ouch, and OK. But if you are are a reader of science fiction, it’s not such a bad thing to be associated with Philip K. Dick or Gordon Dickson. Also note that the letter “L” is normally unpronounced in such English words as “palm,” “Holmes.” & “could.” Respectively, these these words are pronounced “pom,” “homes,” & “kood.” Though these details of Anglic phonetics might seem a bit over-wrought at times, they come in handy when one is searching for an end rhyme.

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      C.B
      As an adult who understands the English language is kind of a screwy one, the mispronunciation doesn’t bother me.
      As a school kid, not so much.

      Reply
  7. Robert Piazza

    I really like “This Collar, Blue.” It paints a picture & evokes a feeling, especially the last line!!

    Reply
    • Zachary Dilks

      Robert
      Thank you for saying that! I’m glad you enjoyed it. The last line is my favorite too. Doesn’t matter how hard and sometimes thankless the work is. There is a feeling of purpose when you do a job well.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.