Beauty in a Butcher’s Shop

By Damian Robin

There can be beauty in a butcher’s shop
Even when that butcher’s shop’s unclean;
And we can make that dirty butchery stop
By listening to the words of a beauty queen.

She has the knowledge, facts, and verbal skills
And depth of purity to make things clear;
And when she says how communism kills
At first her sense is easy on the ear.

But as her words flow through, there’s consternation.
Her hair’s soft silk – but is her smooth talk true?
For why don’t governments pay attention?
Are they confused by what good looks can do?

In fact, hard truth is hard to hear and take,
But beauty must have Truth, or else mistake.

 

For Reference:

Anastasia Lin’s website
Boston Globe article December 13, 2016
Epoch Times article December 15, 2016

 

Damian Robin lives in England where he works for an international newspaper and lives with his wife and three children.


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2 Responses

  1. Eddie Aitken

    Beauty with a righteous voice
    Lays it out to make your choice
    Indifference or uncompassionate ear
    Or in some cases implicated fear
    The story’s out for all to ponder
    For now efforts seem to fail
    But for those who care their hearts may sail

    Reply
  2. Damian Robin

    Courage
    http://www.anastasialin.com/home/

    Though in your homeland you are persona non grata,
    And Communists would break your Chinese father,
    And The Party kill you inside China,
    You do not wear the ball gown of a martyr.

    Though in the vice of western media glitz,
    Though in the jaws of fame, though where you steer
    The life-consuming giant dragon spits,
    You still cast off its dressing-downs of fear.

    Sometimes it seems you’re crowned with confidence
    Though you may talk on stage through circling fright.
    Your actress training swells experience
    To move you into widening arcs of light.

    And though you’re often scared, you radiate,
    Though clothed by fame, you wear it without pride,
    Though strong-willed, you still must meditate,
    And cultivate, to face the world outside.
    EndFragment

    Reply

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