There’s a wonder about it, the fragile beauty of lace.
Many kinds for centuries have been important to own;
one can go to Ireland, Flanders, from place to place—
they’re in catalogs: Irish, Mechlin, lace for the home.

Many kinds for centuries have been important to own;
even I have Battenberg and Grandmother’s crochet.
They’re in catalogs: Irish, Mechlin, lace for the home;
bobbins have made many a stitched bouquet.

Even I have Battenberg and Grandmother’s crochet
to clutch at night, seek at dawn to see its grace.
Bobbins have made many a stitched bouquet,
painters captured delicate collars in the portrait face.

To clutch at night, seek at dawn to see its grace
is a security that would be impossible to replace.
Painters captured delicate collars in the portrait face:
with me, a lace piece or two, will always have a place,

is a security that would be impossible to replace:
to see patterns in the daily maze;
with me, a lace piece or two, will always have a place:
the enjoyment of lace is not just a passing phase

to see patterns in the daily maze.
One can go to Ireland, Flanders, from place to place—
the enjoyment of lace is not just a passing phase:
there’s a wonder about it, the fragile beauty of lace.

 

Carol Smallwood’s over four dozen books include Women on Poetry: Writing, Revising, Publishing and Teaching, on Poets & Writers Magazine list of Best Books for Writers. Water, Earth, Air, Fire, and Picket Fences is a 2014 collection from Lamar University Press; Divining the Prime Meridian, is forthcoming from WordTech Editions. She has appeared in such journals as: Drunken Boat; The Writer’s Chronicle; The Main Street Rag; Jelly Bucket; English Journal. Carol has founded, supports humane societies.

Featured Image: “Lily of the Valley, Lace, Williamsburg Tea Caddy” by Jeanne Illenye


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