Inside the desire for revenge
is a painful vulnerability,
a reminder of damage that won’t leave,

and you wish for satisfaction,
or just acknowledgment of the wrong.
Instead, frustration grows with denial,

and suffering returns in intensity,
as if time had scarcely elapsed.
Better not to ask for what won’t be given,

even for a great sin or terrible crime.
When at last you realize the hurt
the hope for revenge still causes you,

you can start to let go. Not acceptance,
but resignation, so unhealed wounds
may close over at last and scar.

 

www.annewhitehouse.com


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