Amy Foreman hails from the southern Arizona desert, where she homesteads with her husband and seven children.  She has enjoyed teaching both English and Music at the college level, but is now focused on home-schooling her children, gardening, farming, and writing. Her blog is theoccasionalcaesura.wordpress.com

 

 


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26 Responses

  1. Susan Jarvis Bryant

    What a bright and beautiful start to my Sunday morning. I love everything about this magnificently crafted concrete poem that captures the true spirit of a family home. Superb!

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      Thank you for reading and appreciating “The House Remembers,” Susan. I am delighted that it provided a good start to your morning!

      Reply
  2. James A. Tweedie

    Amy, You loaded the bases with your family and then hit a grand slam. A creative, and well-crafted construction by a clever contractor! It’s been a long time since your last post. Glad to see you’re still at it!

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      Thanks, James! 2019 didn’t have much wiggle-room for writing poetry, but I think 2020 might be a little easier on my poetic leisure time!

      Reply
  3. Joe Tessitore

    May I add my voice to Susan’s and James’, and I’m glad they chimed in before I did – this one truly leaves me speechless!

    Reply
  4. Joseph S. Salemi

    A fine example of technopaignia, or the “figured poem.” The best-known specimen in English is the seventeenth-century “Easter-Wings,” though there are also instances from Greek and Latin verse. What I like about Ms. Foreman’s piece is that there is no problem at all in following her perfect tetrameter, her solid rhymes (which are sustained at great length!), and her clear and precise enjambments. This poem took a lot of work, but it’s as sturdy and well-constructed as the house it describes.

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      I appreciate your comment very much, Dr. Salemi–especially your explanation of this type of “shaped” or “figured” poem. Indeed, I was inspired by George Herbert’s technopaignia in creating a shaped poem, although my favorite of his is “The Altar.”

      Reply
  5. Amy Foreman

    Thank you, Evan, for creatively superimposing my “house” onto that green hill in the photograph. Very nice!

    Reply
  6. Tonya Ann McQuade

    What a beautiful description! I love how you’ve captured the house’s observations and perspective – and how you do it with such interesting rhyme and meticulous meter. Would you mind if I use this as an example of concrete poetry with my high school students?

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      I would be tickled if you used this poem as an example with your students, Tonya! Thank you for thinking of it.

      Reply
  7. David Watt

    Amy, it’s a wonderful start to my day to see your highly creative and perfectly rhymed ‘structural’poem. I look forward to reading more in 2020.

    Reply
  8. C.B. Anderson

    Amy, the strange thing for me is how a homemaker suddenly became a house builder. I don’t think I’ve ever seen such an expansive example of this type of poem — it must be at least 3,000 square feet.

    Reply
  9. James Sale

    Excellent poetry, Amy – Herbert is one of my favourites and this is a superb homage in its way and ingenious continuation of the tradition.

    Reply
  10. Monty

    I dunno how long it’s been since your last offering to these pages, Amy: but in that time, I’ve occasionally found myself wondering when the next one will be. Now . . the above ‘masterpiece of imagination’ has shown that it was definitely worth waiting for.

    With ‘concrete poems’, I’ve often struggled in the past to relate the visual shape with the actual poem, hence questioned the very necessity of the ‘shape’.. which has left me feeling that it can sometimes seem to be a bit of a gimmick. But your piece above is ‘concrete’ not only in name, but also ‘concrete’ as an adjective; and could (should?) be used as an example to demonstrate the essence of concrete poetry in its purest form.

    And then . . the very concept of the poem: 50 years of domestic history as told by the one body that has witnessed each and every little thing, and has heard each and every word spoken . . or sung! The house speaks. As for the rhyme maintenance: I found myself staring at the piece trying to imagine how – if it was in normal stanza form – rich it would be with internal rhymes. Another thing, although it’s only a tiny aspect: I like the way you contracted the word ‘though’ in L4, in keeping with the shape of the roof.

    Well worth the wait, Amy . . bravo.

    p.s. If anyone reading this is discovering Amy for the first time, I implore you to enter her name into the search-bar above/below to view some of her previous offerings; and it’ll become apparent as to why her work is always highly anticipated at SCP.

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      Monty, I’m delighted that you were anticipating another submission from me, and equally delighted that you found “The House Remembers” worth the wait. And thank you for the endorsement!

      Reply
  11. Satyananda Sarangi

    Greetings, Amy ma’am 🙂

    I have no words to describe how I felt reading this. You have pulled off a masterstroke.
    Loved it.

    Regards and best wishes

    Reply
  12. Rod

    I would echo every sentiment expressed above Amy – it’s a delightful piece and I thoroughly enjoyed it. When time permits I intent to follow Monty’s advice and look your work up online. Best wishes – Rod.

    Reply
    • Amy Foreman

      Thank you, Rob, for your comment, and for checking out my other poetry on this site. Blessings to you!

      Reply

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