Odyssey of Theodicy

It is a strange fact, clearly biblical—
In this case God’s will is most puzzling:
At times, He moves mountains with miracles,
But may not remove the cup of suffering.

A daughter wrecks her car—climbs out unscathed;
A son, stroke-struck, breathes out—and then is dead.
Our hope in Him is that both shall be raised:
“I am the resurrection and the life,” He said.

 

 

Prayer Team

On Wednesday nights, we read each soul’s request—
Now many years. Their pleas enshroud the room.
A blood smeared slide showed cancer in Jill’s breast.
A drive-by shooting stole Alexis’ groom.
Bill, in his easy chair, suffered a stroke.
Dan broke a hip and is in ICU.
Sue’s son is on the streets, speed balling coke.
Jane’s bound in bed last week with type B flu.
We read and pray through every person’s list
And feel the weight of sorrow on our chests.
It is a wonder how such souls persist—
Amid their weary days and countless tests.
__Many cascade down life’s relentless slopes.
__We pray for God to lift their fragile hopes.

 

 

Peter Venable has been writing poetry for 50 years. He has been published in Windhover, Third Wednesday, Time of Singing, The Merton Seasonal, American Vendantist, The Anglican Theological Review, and others. He is a member of the Winston Salem Writers. On the whimsical side, he has been published in Bluepepper, Parody, Laughing Dog, The Asses of Parnassus, Lighten Up Online (e. g. # 48) and The Society Of Classical Poets.


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3 Responses

  1. Peter Hartley

    Peter – I concur whole-heartedly with what Leo says above, I like the three pairs of slant rhymes in the first and I’m very fond of the theme which I pursue constantly in my own contributions to this site, the apparent injustice of God and his mysterious ways. There is not much vindication here either barring the last two lines of each, but there is fervent hope to be found expressed in both.

    Reply
  2. C.B. Anderson

    Yes, those slant rhymes leave much to the imagination, and do much to enhance the mood you intend. God’s ways are certainly a mystery, but how could it be otherwise? A simple-minded deity could never have created such a multi-faceted universe. If you don’t like it, then go somewhere else. The problem is that there is nowhere else to go — He’s the only God/Creator we’ve got.

    Reply

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