.
The candlelight was dim and spare
And Claire was there, lost in prayer
And slightly swaying to and fro
(She dances for Him, this I know)
And I do swear that she did glow—
Whence comes this light? He does bestow.
.

.

Joe Tessitore is a retired New York City resident and poet.


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9 Responses

  1. Norma Okun

    I love the poem. I only would take the And out. It would flow like the light you are speaking about. That is only a suggestion. I still care for the poem just the way you wrote it.

    Reply
  2. Panagiota Romios

    Joe~ breathtaking in its beauty, wrapped in utter
    beauty and grand simplicity. Thank you.

    Reply
  3. Susan Jarvis Bryant

    Joe, this is beautiful in its brevity. There have been precious moments in my life illuminated by the very “glow” you mention.

    Reply
  4. C.B. Anderson

    Nice, Joe. My own daughter was once engaged with ballet. Now she’s a mother, and the dance she dances is much more complicated than it was before, but still she is attentive to the Lord’s grace. I am humbled in her presence, and I am struck to the core by your brief poem.

    Reply
    • Joe Tessitore

      It sounds like your daughter and Claire were cut from the same cloth.
      Thank you for your very touching comment.

      Reply
  5. BRIAN YAPKO

    Such a sweet, simple poem and yet a jewel — especially the last line.

    Reply
  6. Paul Freeman

    I’ve been a fan of the short poem ever since reading Wordsworth’s ‘A Slumber did my Spirit Seal’.

    I really liked this poem, Joe.

    I’d agree that removing ‘And’ before ‘slightly’. It made the poem flow better for me.

    The placement of the question mark halfway through the last line (followed by an answer) rather than at the end, is quite masterful and thought-provoking.

    Thanks for the read.

    Reply

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