.

My Raven

My Raven is a different bird.
I guess he learned a different word
Than Poe’s that uttered “Nevermore.”
My Raven tells me, “Furthermore.”

“Alright” I said “what do you want?
Why did you choose my place to haunt?
Why are you sitting at my door?”
My Raven told me, “Furthermore.”

“I do not mean to be absurd,
But you are such a funny bird.”
I wrote a poem; and then some more
My Raven challenged, “Furthermore?”

So then I wrote another story
That was full of allegory.
“How do you like its blood and gore?”
My Raven answered, “Furthermore?”

I wrote all night and slept all day.
I thought the Raven flew away.
When nighttime came, knocks pound the door.
It was my Raven, furthermore.

Now every night I have to write,
And nothing spurs my Raven’s flight.
I write a lot and then some more,
But then he tells me, “Furthermore.”

I think for my Thanksgiving feast
I need to cook that horrid beast,
And then my Raven, furthermore,
Will be a Raven nevermore.

.

.

LTC Roy E. Peterson is a writer, retired U.S. Army Military Intelligence Officer, Foreign Area Officer, and Foreign Commercial Officer who currently resides in Texas.


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13 Responses

  1. Peter Hartley

    Roy – over the first six verses I felt quite an affection growing in me towards this raven and was quite horrified to hear of its prospective execution in the last verse. Furthermore ravens, indeed all corvids, are exceptionally intelligent birds and have been known to be able to count up to at least two. Furthermore I have heard of one raven that could (barely) speak a word of English. Furthermore every member of the crow family tastes better than turkey (or so I have been led to believe). Rooks are particularly delicious when gently roasted at 220’ centigrade, gas mark 4, and consumed whole with fried rice and a sprig of oregano. Furthermore…

    Reply
    • Roy E. Peterson

      Wow! I delight in your comments! I hope I don’t have to “eat crow!”

      Reply
  2. David Watt

    Roy, I love your humorous take on this famous poem.
    Residents of our state of South Australia are forevermore known as “crow eaters” because early settlers were reputed to have relied on crow breast for their red meat. Maybe they gently roasted the birds precisely as Peter
    describes.

    Reply
  3. Pranav

    ”And then my Raven, furthermore,
    Will be a Raven nevermore.”
    Brilliant rhyme scheme with a humorous twist. I loved how the grim subject of man’s conversation with a raven which utters a single word in Poe’s writing was changed to something much more comedic.

    Reply

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