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Decolonising the Curriculum – Dual Scenario

on Salford University’s recent treatment of the sonnet.

We must decolonise our poetry
Because it’s the twenty-first century,
So don’t get preachy, telling me
We owe it to ourselves and our ancient codes
To read sonnets and odes,
To write limericks and rondeaux,
To revel in villanelles we compose.
I’m sure it’s safe enough to say
Traditional verse has become passé;
Nobody on planet Earth can convince me
We still need rhyming and metrical poetry!

We still need rhyming and metrical poetry!
Nobody on planet Earth can convince me
Traditional verse has become passé.
I’m sure it’s safe enough to say,
To revel in villanelles we compose,
To write limericks and rondeaux
To read sonnets and odes,
We owe it to ourselves and our ancient codes;
So don’t get preachy, telling me
Because it’s the twenty-first century,
We must decolonise our poetry.

.

.

Paul A. Freeman is the author of Rumours of Ophir, a crime novel which was taught in Zimbabwean high schools and has been translated into German. In addition to having two novels, a children’s book and an 18,000-word narrative poem (Robin Hood and Friar Tuck: Zombie Killers!) commercially published, Paul is the author of hundreds of published short stories, poems and articles.


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18 Responses

    • Paul Freeman

      Thanks, JD.

      I have Evan’s encouragement and input to thank for pushing this poem beyond what I thought it could be.

      Reply
  1. Margaret Coats

    I’m sure it took labor to compose this work of wit! What to call it? A palindrome reads the same forward and backward, but also means the same. This reads forward and backward for opposing meanings. It would seem to suit the Mirrorverse game to be released in a week or so, as it will heartily confuse role-players. Great fun, Paul.

    Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      Thank you for reading, Margaret. And thanks for the intriguing word ‘mirrorverse’ which sounds somewhat akin to the ‘multiverse’.

      Reply
  2. Russel Winick

    Good work Paul. Reminds me of an editor who told me that the topic of one of my poems was too serious for meter and rhyme. Ha!

    Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      The more I learn about meter and rhyme, the more I see which is more suitable for light and serious verse – though some suit both.

      Thanks for reading Russel.

      Reply
  3. Cynthia Erlandson

    Wonderful word play, and you’re making a true and important point. Very clever, indeed!

    Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      You’re making me blush, Cynthia.

      Thanks for reading and I’m glad you liked it.

      Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      I went from thinking it was impossible to eureka with this one.

      Thanks for reading, Cheryl.

      Reply
  4. Clive Boddy

    Well done Paul, very clever. I feel that the free form fraternity would not be in favour. However, even the society of classical poets may shortly be publishing some ‘free verse’.

    Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      Well, it’s not perfectly metered and does have a rap quality in places.

      I sometimes write in free verse if I want to explore a metaphor more extensively, often transferring it to my prose work. But when it comes down to it, I’m a traditionalist.

      Thanks for reading, Clive.

      Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      And thank you for reading and expressing your thoughts, Allegra.

      Reply
  5. Norma Pain

    I really enjoyed this very clever word/line play Paul. It also speaks to me about communication and how some ideas can get misinterpreted if not spoken clearly. I love the idea behind the poem; it works well.

    Reply
  6. C.B. Anderson

    I applaud your effort to fight what is obviously an uphill battle. Never surrender!

    Reply
    • Paul Freeman

      There are still enough traditional competitions and publishers around, which keeps me busy – though of course I’d like to be busier.

      Two days ago, for a competition, I wrote a poem about the proposal of UK politicians wanting to switch back to imperial measures, and last night I transformed ‘Composed on Westminster Bridge’ into prose (Okay, that might be sacrilege), also for a competition. Then there’s the Maria W Faust Sonnet competition we’re awaiting the results of.

      Thanks for reading, CB.

      Reply

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