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There Is No God?

“There is no God,”
Some men do say.
This doubt, some voice,
And claim this day.

If God is myth
Who gave us eyes?
Who gave us joy?
Who paints blue skies?

Have they no dog,
Have they no wife,
Have they no child
So full of life?

Awake each morn,
And thankful not?
Not on their knees
For all they’ve got?

How does the sun
Rise in the east?
Look now around—
Life is a feast!

How moves our heart?
Who made our friends?
Who made these hands
For wounds to mend?

There is no God?
Just chance and dust?
Life is in vain?
In naught we trust?

Be still your mind,
Let your heart free,
Let feelings in…
There God will be.

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Michael Charles Maibach began writing poems at age nine.  Since then he has continued writing poems, and sharing them with friends.  His career has involved global business diplomacy.  He is a native of Peoria, Illinois.  Today Michael resides in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia.  More of his poems are found at www.MaibachPoems.us or on Facebook.


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22 Responses

  1. Michael Pietrack

    Romans 1:20 For his invisible qualities are clearly seen from the world’s creation onward, because they are perceived by the things made, even his eternal power and Godship, so that they are inexcusable.

    Reply
  2. Roy E. Peterson

    Stark truths like these embedded in your poem should stimulate logical minds to one inescapable conclusion. There has to be some supernatural being we call God who brought order out of chaos.

    Reply
  3. Cheryl Corey

    Michael, I read your poem with great interest, as just this week I’ve been questioning the existence of God. Can the universe really be that random?

    Reply
    • James Sale

      Wonderful and provoking poem, Michael, thank you. And Cheryl, I think arguments (in the head) persuade nobody, for it is only in the heart that the soul speaks and more importantly hears … but that said, here are some interesting pointers: ‘Multiverse devotees … accept a package of wonders, including a universe-generating mechanism … By providing an all-too-easy explanation for anything that has happened or may happen, the multiverse ends up explaining nothing at all … A random miracle is arguably less scientific than a theistic miracle. The former has no identifiable cause, mechanism, or rationality; the latter allows the identification of both cause, means, and rationale’ Paul Davies/Bruce Gordon

      Reply
  4. Joseph S. Salemi

    I wonder if Mr. Maibach is writing this poem as a direct references to the famous poem by Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), titled “There Is No God.” That piece begins with several quatrains that describe the sorts of persons who tend to be atheists, and the reasons they give for their disbelief. But Clough ends with these three incisive quatrains:

    But country folks who live beneath
    The shadow of the steeple;
    The parson and the parson’s wife,
    And mostly married people;

    Youths green and happy in first love,
    So thankful for illusion;
    And men caught out in what the world
    Calls guilt, in first confusion;

    And almost everyone when age,
    Disease, or sorrows strike him,
    Inclines to think there is a God,
    Or something very like him.

    This last quatrain reminds me of what military chaplains say about men who experience combat: “There are no atheists in the trenches.”

    Reply
    • James Sale

      Great reference Joe. And true – there are no atheists in the trenches; why even Capaneus believed in Zeus as he assaulted the walls of Thebes.

      Reply
  5. Norma Pain

    Everyone with eyes that see, or hearts that feel, know God is key.
    A lovely, inspirational poem, thank you Michael.

    Reply
  6. Satyananda Sarangi

    Hello Mr. Michael.

    What a great, uplifting poem! This describes how an atheist transforms through spirituality.

    A gem of a poem!

    Thank you and best wishes.

    Reply
  7. Alena Casey

    Unfortunately, too many people today do not have wives and children, one of God’s greatest gifts and reminders of his grace!

    Reply
  8. AB Brown

    For some reason I laughed when I read the line, ‘In naught we trust?’—so true, could be a motto for many living today, the implicit caption to every lurid and inane Instagram post.

    Last stanza quite moving. Stillness, freedom, emotional authenticity. These things are the essence of spirituality.

    I can tell, Michael, that you are a very genuine guy. This impression is confirmed when I Google you and see pictures of you in a bow tie. Only genuine people have the courage to wear bow ties today.

    Reply
  9. David Watt

    Thank you Michael for this uplifting piece. We do need to count our blessings, and give thanks to God.

    Reply
  10. weewayne

    The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. They are corrupt, they have done abominable works, there is none that doeth good. – Psalm 14:1

    Reply

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