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Classical Poets Live with Andrew Benson Brown

Episode 7 Part 2: C.B. Anderson, Poetical Gardener

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Andrew Benson Brown has had poems and reviews published in a few journals. His epic-in-progress, Legends of Liberty, will chronicle the major events of the American Revolution if he lives to complete it. Though he writes history articles for American Essence magazine, he lists his primary occupation on official forms as ‘poet.’ He is, in other words, a vagabond.


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12 Responses

  1. Shaun C. Duncan

    I only wish this was longer. It was nice to hear C.B talk about his influences and I’m intrigued that Don Paterson got a mention – there’s some great stuff in his book of sonnets but I’ll take “Mortal Soup And The Blue Yonder” over it any day.

    Reply
    • ABB

      The raw footage was longer, but after editing out conversational gaps, etc, you’d be surprised how much shorter it ends up. Could always do a part two, though!

      Reply
  2. Cheryl Corey

    I like the analogy to gardening. The poem begins like a seed planted in your mind; it’s something that you nourish, with the hope that it will come into full bloom.

    Reply
    • ABB

      Thanks Cheryl. We didn’t really discuss the overt similarity there—in truth, I just needed an angle when making the slide! But the analogy, as you draw out, has many points of connection.

      Reply
  3. Evan Mantyk

    Andrew, I have always wanted to meet Kip Anderson. Thank you for making that possible, sort of.

    Reply
  4. Joseph S. Salemi

    I really enjoyed this episode with Kip Anderson. His comments were so perceptive, intelligent, and on the mark that it made me regret the passing of the older world of excellent formal poetry, where guys and gals like Anderson were the rule, and not the exception.

    Reply
    • ABB

      The old masters will rise again. Maybe not until the next civilization comes along, though.

      Reply
  5. Monika Cooper

    I enjoyed this interview very much. Louise Gluck (sorry, don’t know how to type the umlaut) is a poet I respect greatly as well.

    Reply
    • C.B. Anderson

      You can’t, Monika, unless you have, say, a German keyboard. What you would have to do is use Microsoft Word (or some other good word-processing program) and then copy & paste it into the comment box. On a typewriter you can type the vowel then backspace and type a double quotation mark — it’s not perfect, but it works ok for lower-case letters.

      Reply
  6. Joseph S. Salemi

    Here is an umlaut: Göring (Goering)

    Just go to Microsoft Word on your computer, hit the link that says “Symbols,” and it will bring you to a vast array of possible letters with or without diacritical marks.

    Find the letter with an umlaut that you want, type it into your text, and then close. Save your entire text with the “copy” function, and bring it to where you want to place it, and then hit the “paste” function.

    It’s easier to do it with Google rather than with Firefox.

    Reply
  7. Susan Jarvis Bryant

    This delightful interview is educative and thoroughly entertaining! Thank you, ABB and CB!

    Reply

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